NEDAC - Arrosage Automatique

The Network for the Development of Agricultural Cooperatives in Asia and the Pacific (NEDAC) is a unique regional forum linking 21 apex cooperative organizations in 12 countries. It was set up in 1991 by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO)’s Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific, the International Cooperative Alliance (ICA) and the International Labour Organization (ILO) on the recommendation of the 1990 ICA regional conference of cooperative ministers.

Initially with 10 cooperative organizations from nine Asian countries as members, NEDAC now has 21 cooperative member organizations in 12 countries. The NEDAC member organizations in Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Mongolia, Nepal, Philippines, Republic of Korea, Sri Lanka and Thailand represent three million agricultural cooperatives which play a crucial role in improving the livelihoods of 150 million rural households.

NEDAC sensitizes governments in the region to the need for a key role for agricultural cooperatives in promoting agricultural and rural development to ensure rural food and livelihood security for hundreds of millions of people in Asia and the Pacific.

REGIONAL NETWORK FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF AGRICULTURAL COOPERATIVES IN ASIA AND THE PACIFIC
FAO Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific
Maliwan Mansion
39, Phra Athit Road
BANGKOK 10200
Thailand
Tel: ++ 662 697 4366
Fax: ++ 662 697 4445

Arrosage Automatique

C'est très bien de passer des heures à vous promener dans votre jardin avec un tuyau ou un arrosoir, mais si vous voulez vraiment garder votre pelouse et vos parterres luxuriants et abondants avec le moins d'effort possible, procurez-vous un système d'arrosage. Ils rafraîchiront votre pelouse pendant que vous vous amusez.

Bon, maintenant que vous êtes de retour avec nous, la prochaine chose dont vous aurez besoin est un contrôleur automatique de programmation de l'eau ou même un système d'irrigation à part entière avec une confluence de tuyaux d'eau pour alimenter les bordures et les semis.

Les plantes en pot sont généralement les premières choses à se flétrir par une chaude journée d'été, donc installer un système d'irrigation goutte à goutte est également une sacrée bonne idée. Ou peut-être investir dans une jardinière à arrosage automatique.

Il existe de nombreux types de systèmes d'arrosage automatiques différents sur le marché, mais, pour vous éviter de vous gratter la tête, nous avons parcouru le Web pour trouver les meilleurs systèmes d'arrosage automatisés pour ceux que vous ne pouvez pas prendre la peine de démêler un tuyau.

Rural Poverty & Agricultural Cooperatives

More than a half a billion people in Asia and the Pacific live on less than one US dollar a day. Hunger and poverty are concentrated in Asian rural areas with three-fourths of the world’s farm households, the majority being small and marginal farmers having less than 1 hectare on average. Small and marginal farmers, rural landless, indigenous people and persons with disabilities, especially women, are the poorest. Living in adverse agro-ecological and natural disaster-prone zones which are typically rain fed lands, remote, landlocked, upland, coastal areas and small islands, vulnerable rural poor are the focus of the United Nations Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Population growth and environmental degradation are reducing access to land, water and other natural resources needed to sustain rural livelihoods. Inadequate non-farm rural work opportunities are forcing more and more rural poor to migrate to urban areas to take up low-paid unskilled employment.

Agricultural cooperatives are democratic member organizations based on the principles of social cohesion, self-help and equity, enabling effective participation by rural poor in local decision-making and improving their access to health, education, credit and housing. Cooperatives promote farm diversification, value-added processing and marketing by small rural producers while reducing associated business risks. Cooperatives in NEDAC member countries have brought together hundreds of thousands of small rural producers to form large business ventures exporting a wide range of agricultural, horticultural and dairy products. (See UN Secretary General’s Report to the General Assembly on the role of Cooperatives)

NEDAC Members

Membership is open to government departments/agencies in the Asia-Pacific region dealing with cooperatives, civil society cooperative movements and institutions engaged in agricultural cooperative development activities. Members meet once every two years in a General Assembly to review past activities and plan future activities which are directed by an Executive Committee elected by the General Assembly.

Bangladesh

Rural Development & Cooperatives Division

Ministry of Local Government Rural Development (LGRD) & Cooperatives

Bangladesh Jatiyo Samobai Union [National Cooperative Union of Bangladesh (BCU)]

China

Department of Rural Cooperative Economy, Ministry of Agriculture

India

Ministry of Agriculture & Cooperatives www.agricoop.nic.in

National Cooperative Union of India (NCUI) www.ncui.net

National Cooperative Development Corporation (NCDC) www.ncdc.in

Indian Farmers Fertilizer Cooperative Ltd. (IFFCO) http:// www.iffco.nic.in

National Federation of State Co-operative Banks www.nafscob.org

National Agriculture Cooperative Marketing Federation of India (NAFED) www.nafed-india.com

Haryana State Cooperative Supply and Marketing Federation Ltd, (HAFED) www.hafed.gov.in

Krishak Bharti Co-operative Ltd., (KRIBHCO),

National Federation of Fishermen’s Cooperative Ltd., (FISHCOFED)

National Consumers Cooperative Federation Ltd., (NCCF)

Indonesia

Ministry of Cooperatives & Small-Medium Enterprise Development

Japan

Central Union of Agricultural Cooperatives (JA-Zenchu)

www.zenchu-ja.or.jp/eng/index.html

Malaysia

Farmers’ Organisation Authority (FOA) www.agrolink.moa.my/lpp

National Farmers’ Association (NAFAS) www.nafas.com.my/v2

Mongolia

Mongolian Association of Private Herders’ Cooperatives

Nepal

National Cooperative Federation (NCF) www.ncfnepal.com.np

National Cooperative Development Board (NCDB)

www.aicc.gov.np/organization/development_boards/ncdb/introduction.php

Philippines

Cooperative Development Authority (CDA)

Republic of Korea

National Agricultural Cooperative Federation (NACF)

www.fao.org/ag/ags/agsm/banks/banks/korea.htm

Sri Lanka

Department of Co-operative Development www.coop.gov.lk/index.asp

Sri Lanka Cooperative Marketing Federation (MARKFED)

Thailand

Cooperative Promotion Department (CPD), Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives

www.cpd.go.th

The Cooperative League of Thailand www.clt.or.th/eng/main.html

NEDAC Constitution

Preamble

Considering the proposal made by ADG/RR, FAORAP in Singapore Consultation conclusion 34 in June 1989 and recommendation 9.1 of the Cooperative Ministers’ Conference in Sydney convened by the ICA/ROAP in February 1990 the agencies and institutions of the countries in the Asia and Pacific Region who are involved and concerned in the promotion and development of agricultural cooperatives;

Recognizing the mutual advantages to be derived through the exchange of technical information know-how and experiences through regional collaboration;

Have decided to establish a regional network on agricultural cooperative development for the Asia and Pacific region hereinafter referred to as the “Network for the Development of Agricultural Cooperatives”, also to be known by its acronym NEDAC which should be governed by the following provision.

ARTICLE I

Name of Network:

The name of the network shall be “Regional Network for Development of Agricultural Cooperatives in Asia and the Pacific” with the acronym NEDAC.

ARTICLE II

Aims and objectives of the Regional Network:

· To sensitize governments on the need for promoting the potential of Agricultural Cooperatives’ role in development particularly in the agricultural, and rural development sector

· To provide a forum for exchange of information and experiences and promote cooperation among member countries through joint efforts and the exchange of knowledge and experiences

· To establish amongst its members an internal based system for data collection, exchange of information and experiences regarding agricultural cooperative development, with a focus on enabling legal and policy frame works of countries; cooperative enterprise development, capacity building/strengthening of agricultural cooperatives, promote agricultural, fisheries and forestry based commodity production, value-addition and marketing at national and regional level

· To strengthen the technical capacity of member institutions especially in identification of problems and formulation of adequate solutions and encourage the countries’ self-confidence through recognition of their own resources, knowledge and skills

· To establish and maintain close working relationships with the FAO, ILO and other international and regional organizations particularly ICA ROAP and other organizations pursuing similar or related objectives. To stimulate the capabilities and training of human resources at all levels and accelerate development through a more efficient utilization of human, physical and financial resources available and

· To document and disseminate success stories in regard to innovative interaction between governments and cooperatives.

ARTICLE III

Scope of Membership

Regular Membership

The Regional Network would be open for membership to all countries of the Asia and Pacific Region on a voluntary basis upon payment of admission fee US$500 and regular membership fee US$2500 or associate membership fee US$1500.

The members may be:-

· Government Ministries and Departments with direct responsibility for agricultural cooperative development

· National level or Apex level cooperative organization concerned with agricultural cooperatives

· Parasitical organizations supporting agricultural cooperative development; and Cooperative Training and Research Institutions; Universities involved in or supporting agricultural cooperative development and International Agencies

· The International Cooperative Alliance, regional Office for Asia and the Pacific (ICA-ROAP) and ILO, Regional Cooperative Development Unit, will be a permanent member of the Network.

Associate Membership

· Organizations unable to pay a regular membership fee of US$2500 may be enrolled as Associate Member upon payment of US$1500 and US$500 admission fee. These may include:

· Regional and national level organizations in the Asia-Pacific Region which by mandate and programme activities are supporting agricultural cooperative development

· Any cooperative organization from outside the region with particular interest in providing support to agricultural cooperative development in Asian and Pacific countries.

· Associate Members will not be represented in EXCOM and will have No Voting right

· Associate Members will have rights equal to that enjoyed by Regular Members in formulation of NEDAC policies/strategies and its programme of

· activities/work plan for agricultural cooperative development.

· NEDAC-Funds as included in the NEDAC work plan will be used for providing travel cost for regular member participants to NEDAC-Meetings/Seminars etc. Associate Members will be expected to join at their own expenses. If however, external funding is available for NEDAC technical meetings then they will be considered for financing travel costs as appropriate.

ARTICLE IV

Obligations of Membership

The obligations of membership of the Network are as follows:-

· Should promptly respond to any request by the Chairman or Secretariat of the Network

· Provide information requested by members of the Network which may not be against any regulations of the country

· Undertake any assignments that may be mutually agreed among the members of the Networks

· Settle financial obligations/membership fees in close consultation with the NEDAC Secretariat. Rescheduling of arrears or any other acceptable solution mutually agreed based upon criteria established by the Executive Committee will be effectualised by the Secretariat and the member concerned

· Collaborate fully with the Network in the fulfillment of the Network’s objectives and functions

· Discuss the programmes of the Network with other members of Networks where they exist and convey their comments/decisions to the secretariat.

ARTICLE V

Functions of the Network

To achieve the objectives in Article II above, the network shall undertake the following functions:-

· Promote the exchange of ideas and experiences among countries in the Asia Pacific Region, on policies, programmes and projects for agricultural cooperative development

· Organize periodic meetings of the network. Collect, collate and disseminate information on agricultural cooperative development and other matters of common interest to its members

· Arrange for and organize consultations, workshops, seminar, research projects, courses and other training programmes for senior level policy makers, cooperative leaders and middle level managerial and technical staff on policies, programme management and technical aspects of agricultural cooperative development

· Any other function which are required to achieve the objectives of the Regional Network.

ACTIVITIES

Agricultural Cooperative Enterprise Development (ACED)

Cooperatives of small-scale agricultural and other rural producers provide an efficient and equitable way of organizing rural poor and building their capacities to start and run village-level enterprises based on farm and non-farm activities. Cooperative farm/non-farm enterprises enable rural poor to share business risk arising from adverse climatic and market conditions while improving their access to natural resources and credit as well as production and marketing services. Cooperative enterprises make it possible for agricultural/rural producers poor to bypass middlemen by linking directly with markets. The members of cooperative enterprises share business responsibilities and profits equitably. This is especially relevant as agricultural trade liberalization exposes small and marginal farmers and other rural producers to growing competition and risks.

There is need for national political commitment to create enabling conditions for agricultural cooperative enterprise development. In particular, this involves making cooperative business management autonomous of government and local political control. Agricultural cooperatives need capacity building support for development of basic entrepreneurship skills including business planning and marketing.

NEDAC, in collaboration with FAO and other partners promotes cooperative policy, legislation and institutional capacity building in support of ACED with emphasis on improving business planning and market information network capacities. NEDAC and FAO have collaborated on a number of activities in support of ACED including regional workshops, policy advocacy and exchange visits by agricultural cooperatives in NEDAC member countries.

2010

NEDAC Members Study Tour to CHINA. (Download Report)

2009

Seminar on National Policies and and Planning for development AGRI. Cooperatives at Bangkok, Thailand.

2008

FAO-NEDAC Regional workshop on “Role of agricultural cooperatives in response to the impact of natural disasters and climate change”; New Delhi. (Download Report)

2007

FAO-NEDAC Regional workshop on “Role of agricultural cooperatives in bio fuel development at community level for rural food and livelihood security”; Pattaya, Thailand. (Download Report)

2006

FAO-NEDAC Seminar on Fair Trade, New Delhi. (Download Report)

2004

Regional Cooperative Experts Meeting on Computerization to promote agricultural Cooperative Enterprise Development; Chiangmai, Thailand. (Download Report)

2003

FAO-NEDAC Regional Meeting on Agricultural Cooperative Enterprise Development (ACED); New Delhi.

NEDAC members’ exchange visit/study tour to India covering the Vaikunth Mehta National Institute of Co-operative Management, Pune, selected cooperatives in Maharashtra, (Warnanagar Complex) and the ICDP-project in Mathura, Uttar Pradesh.

NEDAC Seminar on “Information technology and computerization of agricultural cooperatives with special reference to SME development and business planning”, Kathmandu.

2002

Initiation of a regional project on capacity building for cooperative enterprise development in collaboration with FAO. Cooperative policy makers, leaders and experts from China, India, Philippines and Thailand met at the FAO Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific in February to finalize the project at a total cost of US$399 999.

NEDAC support to two FAO-initiated ACED activities – China Western Region Development and an experts’ meeting on rice farming in Asia.

2001

Round Table Meeting on Globalization and Liberalization: Challenges and Options for Agricultural Cooperatives in Asia; Bangkok.

Roundtable Meeting on Capacity Building of Agricultural Cooperatives to Meet Market and Human Resources Development Requirements; Beijing.

Fair Trade

Fair Trade and cooperatives are natural partners as both aim to promote sustainable well-being of small-scale producers based on democratic and equitable participation by members. Cooperatives are a fundamental part of the Fair Trade movement in that the majority of Fair Trade producers are members of various cooperatives. Cooperative principles meet Fair Trade standards such as freedom of association for members, democratic decision-making and elimination of unnecessary middlemen who reduce producer income. Like the Fair Trade movement, the cooperative movement involves partnership between members in industrialised and developing countries.

The Fair Trade avenue is highly relevant for cooperatives of small-scale rural producers who often work in adverse agro-ecological conditions with limited access to production resources, markets and services. Small-scale agricultural and rural producers now face increasing market competition as a result of farm trade liberalization and globalization which also threatens local control over traditional knowledge. Large-scale international food retail centres are entering national markets and setting variable food standards and prices as well as new marketing conditions that affect small local producers. In addition, developing world agricultural and rural producers face non-tariff trade barriers in developed countries such as food safety, product quality, environmental and labour standards.

As members of a large national or international Fair Trade cooperative network, cooperatives can avoid falling into the so-called “fair-trade trap”, i.e. becoming dependent of a few industrialised country buyers. The century-old cooperative movement is well organized, deep-rooted and wide-spread and Fair Trade networks can benefit from partnering with cooperatives.

There is need for development of Fair Trade knowledge centres to promote information exchange among cooperatives on Fair Trade-related opportunities, capacity building and networking. There is need for capacity building at the local community level for promotion of Fair Trade-based income and employment generation through agricultural cooperatives. A cooperative Fair Trade development strategy could focus on clustering and integration of agricultural cooperative business activities aimed at up-scaling, specialization, diversification of Fair Trade products and services.

2006

FAO-NEDAC Seminar on Fair Trade, New Delhi.

Bio fuels for Rural Food and Livelihood Security

The bulk of rural energy consumption in Asia is by households of small and marginal landholders, tenants or landless. Farming and rural industries account for less than 20 percent of all rural energy usage in the region. Between 80 to 90 percent of Asia’s rural household energy needs are met by wood fuels and crop residues. About one billion rural people in the region depend solely on traditional energy sources. The collection of biomass – mainly fuel wood – which is the main source of rural household energy, is primarily the responsibility of women and girls. This is a big burden on their time, energy and health, thereby depriving them of more economically productive work opportunities.

The availability of sustainable and low-cost energy sources can vitalize agricultural productivity and help create multiple rural non-farm livelihood opportunities based on small and medium-scale rural enterprise development. Small-scale rural industries currently account for less than 10 percent of total rural energy demand. The inadequacy of the prevailing top-down, supply-side approach to rural energy development has highlighted the need for decentralized, stand-alone and renewable energy sources.

Agricultural and rural cooperatives can play a useful role in improving access to affordable and sustainable bio energy in remote rural areas to boost farm productivity and other livelihood options. Being highly labour-intensive, bio fuel production offers opportunities for the involvement of small-scale rural producers’ groups and cooperatives in small-scale bio energy production and its use at local level. Bio fuel feedstock can be produced by small and marginal landholders and sold for centralised processing. The more involved farmers are in production, processing and use of bio fuels, the more likely they are to share the benefits.

Small and medium-sized enterprises can play a central role in developing bio fuel markets in rural areas. Clusters of such enterprises can link up with large-scale agro-industrial chains. Farmer cooperatives can link small-scale bio fuel feedstock producers with large-scale bio fuel businesses. In Brazil and USA, farmer cooperatives ensure gains to small farmers from large corporations dominating the bio fuel industry. India’s National Biodiesel Mission aims to involve self-help groups and cooperatives of rural poor in the cultivation of jatropha plantation on degraded lands and marketing the jatropha seed for processing into biodiesel.

2007

FAO-NEDAC Regional workshop on “Role of agricultural cooperatives in bio fuel development at community level for rural food and livelihood security”; Pattaya, Thailand

Role of Agricultural Cooperatives in Mitigation/Adaptation to Impact of Climate Change and Natural Disasters

Rural institutions have a vital role in mitigating the impact of natural disasters and climate change on rural people. As democratic, participatory organizations of rural poor, based on the principles of social cohesion, self-help and equity, agricultural cooperatives can be highly effective in preparing the rural poor to respond to the threat to life, property and livelihoods from natural disasters and climate change. As village-level providers of formal and informal education, agricultural cooperatives can also be channels for timely communication of disaster early warning information to rural people as well as training them in adaptation strategies in response to the impact of natural disasters and climate change on rural food and livelihood security.

In addition, agricultural cooperatives have and can play a crucial role in promotion of farm practices that contribute towards climate change mitigation as well as adaptation. Adaptation to climate change for small-scale agricultural producers involves livelihood diversification. Agricultural and rural cooperatives can link small and marginal farmers and other rural poor with larger rural/urban/international markets through value- addition, thereby creating off-farm livelihood opportunities for vulnerable rural poor.

Agricultural and rural cooperatives can also help harness traditional rural knowledge on climate change mitigation and adaptation.

FAO project experience in Bangladesh and the Philippines on livelihood adaptation to climate change and reducing rural poor vulnerability to recurrent natural disasters shows that an active role by local farmers’ organizations, cooperatives, local governments and NGOs is vital.

LINKS

FAO Natural Resources Management and Environment Department http://www.fao.org/nr/clim/clim_en.htm

FAO Climate Change and Bioenergy Unit (NRCB) http://www.fao.org/nr/dep/nrcb/nrcb_en.htm

Disaster Risk Management Systems Analysis http://www.fao.org/nr/clim/abst/clim_080302_en.htm

Developing Institutions and Options for Livelihood Adaptation to Climate Variability and Change in Drought-prone Areas of Bangladesh http://www.fao.org/sd/dim_pe4/pe4_061103_en.htm

Climate variability and change: Adaptation to drought in Bangladesh. A resource book and training guide http://www.fao.org/nr/clim/abst/clim_070901_en.htm

Hazard risk preparedness in agriculture: Good practice examples from south and south-east Asia http://www.fao.org/nr/clim/abst/clim_070501_en.htm

2008

FAO-NEDAC Regional workshop on “Role of agricultural cooperatives in response to the impact of natural disasters and climate change”; New Delhi. (Download Report)

In addition to a range of recommendations, the workshop also issued a statement:

NEDAC STATEMENT ON THE ISSUE OF CLIMATE CHANGE

NEDAC and its member organizations …

  1. recognize the adverse impact of climate change on small farmers and mankind and their ability to respond in terms of sustainable resource management and livelihoods

  1. recognize the role and potential of agricultural cooperatives in efficiently implementing programmes to cushion the impact of natural disasters and climate change

  1. recognize the ability of governments to develop and implement policies necessary to modify people’s behaviour towards sustainable consumption patterns and goods production to promote ecologically healthy lifestyles

  1. support initiatives of small farmer cooperatives, governments and community organizations aimed at awareness building on the issue of climate change and at building capacities to respond to its catastrophic effect;

  1. collaborate across boarders, faiths, and ideologies in order to promote awareness and generate support to address the causes of climate change.

2005-2007

Assessment of impact and formulation of livelihood rehabilitation proposals for victims of December 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami in India, Sri Lanka and Thailand

The December 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami severely affected livelihoods of millions of small-scale coastal fisher folk and farmers in India, Indonesia, Sri Lanka and Thailand. NEDAC, with funding from the Dutch NGO Agriterra, and in collaboration with FAO, assessed the tsunami’s impact on members of agricultural cooperatives, in particular fisher folk and small farmer households in the four countries in order to formulate livelihood rehabilitation proposals for affected cooperatives’ members.

INDIA

In India, a joint NEDAC, FAO and NCUI (National Cooperative Union of India) mission visited the tsunami-hit southern coastal state of Tamil Nadu in July-August 2006. The mission objective was (i) to assess the impact of the tsunami on agriculture cooperatives; (ii) to identify gaps in assistance provided to affected households or individual members of agricultural cooperatives and (iii) to formulate a Rehabilitation Action Plan for tsunami-affected households as members of agricultural cooperatives.

The tsunami affected 376 villages with more than 125,500 households, damaging 11,750 ha of fertile farm land in 13 districts of Tamil Nadu. The coastal districts of Cuddalore and Nagapattinam suffered maximum damage with large-scale destruction of fishing boats and damage to fertile land, devastating local livelihoods in more than 120 villages. A large number of people were physically disabled by the disaster. The NEDAC-FAO-NCUI team travelled to Cuddalore and Viluparam districts.

Rehabilitation proposals

The NEDAC-FAO-NCUI team held discussions with all stakeholders including cooperative leaders and members to determine priority rehabilitation needs. Livelihood rehabilitation proposals for tsunami-affected cooperatives were formulated and discussed at a national workshop in Cuddalore in November 2006 which was attended by local cooperative leaders, managers, cooperative officials and representatives from the NCUI national office in New Delhi, the National Institute of Cooperative Management, the FAO Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific in Thailand and NEDAC.

The rehabilitation proposals were re-examined for technical aspects, revised and finalized after discussions with local cooperative officials during a subsequent NEDAC-FAO-NCUI mission to Tamil Nadu in April 2007. A total of 27 livelihood/activity proposals were submitted by nine cooperatives with a total funding request for Rs 12,720,000 (US$326 154). Some of the beneficiaries/cooperatives agreed to meet the full annual recurring costs and others agreed to bear 10 percent of the assistance requested.

The proposed livelihood rehabilitation activities complement the medium and long-term tsunami rehabilitation work under way by the government and multilateral agencies such as the Asian Development Bank, World Bank and the International Fund for Agricultural Development which focus on rehabilitation of physical, agricultural and fisheries infrastructure (http://www.tn.gov.in/tsunami/) which were not adequately focused on small-scale rural self-employment generation based on activities other than farming and fisheries.

(http://www.tn.gov.in/tsunami/project-atr-teap.html http://www.tn.gov.in/tsunami/project-atr.html http://www.tn.gov.in/tsunami/tsunami-relief.html)

The NEDAC-FAO-NCUI proposals involve beneficiary organizations in monitoring and evaluation of the proposed livelihood activities as the agricultural cooperative banks are in direct contact with the Self Help Groups on a regular basis.

SRI LANKA

In 2006, a mission comprising officials from Co-operative Development Department, Sri Lanka, FAO and NEDAC along with local cooperative officials visited affected coastal province and districts in the country for discussions with affected cooperative members and leaders on the tsunami’s impact on livelihoods and assessment of priority needs for formulating livelihood rehabilitation proposals. A total of 23 proposals were finalized with a total funding request for US$777,899

THAILAND

A mission comprising representatives from Co-operative Promotion Department (CPD), Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives (MOAC), the Co-operative League of Thailand (CLT), the FAO Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific and NEDAC along with local cooperative officials visited the affected coastal areas in Phang-nga and Trang provinces in south Thailnad in March 2006 for discussions with cooperative leaders and members on the impact of the tsunami on livelihoods and assessment of priority needs for rehabilitation. A total of 12 proposals were finalized with a total funding request for US$340,565 and submitted to Agriterra.

Policy and Legal Framework

NEDAC offers a neutral platform for dialogue on agricultural cooperative development issues including policy, legislation and decision-making by bringing together government decision-makers and cooperative leaders.

Member institutions of the network meet once every two years for a General Assembly to discuss the programme of work for the coming biennium focused on:

promoting cooperative policy frameworks of member counties with a focus on legislative reforms, enterprise development, building and strengthening institutional capacities of agricultural cooperatives (including fishery, livestock and forestry);

sensitizing governments on the need for promoting the role of agricultural cooperatives in agricultural and rural development for improved rural food and livelihood security

ISSUES

Lack of coordination among government cooperative development agencies operating with limited budgets and different orientations; lack of decentralized decision-making to facilitate farmer demand-driven cooperative development.

Outdated cooperative legislation, not covering all cooperative sectors, not always giving due recognition to cooperatives as membership-based, self-reliant organizations, and their specific needs as small-scale rural SMEs.

Inadequate institutional capacities for capacity building on cooperative business development by small-scale farmer cooperatives, women’s and other rural poor groups.

Rigidness in national development policies allowing for increased import of subsidized food in response to urban demand.

2010 NEDAC EXCOM-2010.

2009 NEDAC-General Assembly

2007 Meeting of NEDAC Executive Committee, Bangkok.

2006 NEDAC-General Assembly, New Delhi. (Download Report)

2003 NEDAC General Assembly, Kathmandu (Download Report)

2001NEDAC General Assembly, Beijing.

CAPACITY BUILDING

NEDAC promotes national and regional-level activities to strengthen professional capacities of member organizations in the fields of business planning, enterprise development and management. It provides a forum for exchange/sharing of information and experiences on cooperative development and promote cooperation amongst member counties through joint efforts/field visits/workshops/seminars etc;

2008

A planned visit to study agricultural cooperatives and other specialized cooperative activities in China has been postponed to 2009-2010.

2007

A planned visit to study agricultural cooperatives in Sri Lanka could not take place due to unavoidable reasons.

2006

Representatives of NEDAC member organizations from China, India, Japan, Malaysia, Nepal, Philippines, Sri Lanka and Thailand visited a cooperative society in Mathura district in Uttar Pradesh State to learn about agricultural input, credit distribution and marketing of agricultural produce.

2004

Nine cooperative officials from China, India, Malaysia, Nepal, Sri Lanka and Thailand travelled to Bangladesh to study two cooperative enterprise models, dairy cooperatives and cooperative training facilities.

2003

NEDAC member representatives from Bangladesh, India, Malaysia, Nepal, Philippines, Sri Lanka and Thailand visited agro-processing, dairy and fishery cooperatives in north and central Thailand

NEDAC members’ exchange visit/study tour to India to the Vaikunth Mehta National Institute of Co-operative Management, Pune, selected cooperatives in Maharashtra, (Warnanagar Complex) and the ICDP-project in Mathura, Uttar Pradesh.

2002

Workshop on developing a training-of-trainers’ (TOT) manual held in Comilla, Bangladesh in collaboration with the Ministry of LGRD & Co-operatives and the Co-operative Department, Dhaka, with funding

support from FAO.

2001

Study tour/exchange visit to Malaysia by 12 cooperative officials from Bangladesh, China, India, Nepal and Thailand to study cooperative development activities, especially those of FOA, Malaysia in supply of agriculture inputs, technology transfer, agro-processing, marketing and organizing savings/credit.

PARTNERSHIP

NEDAC, in technical collaboration with FAO and other partners, works with government and cooperative movement partners for exchange of information, sharing of experiences and discussion on the policy and legal framework for agricultural cooperative development, as well as capacity building of member organizations, particularly in agricultural cooperative enterprise development.

The aim of the partnership is to create synergy between government cooperative departments and the cooperative movement at the country level for enabling policy and legislative reform conducive to agricultural cooperative development for sustainable agriculture and rural development ensuring rural food and livelihood security.

NEDAC PARTNERS

Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO)

International Cooperative Alliance (ICA)

International Labour Organization (ILO)

Committee for the Promotion and Advancement of Cooperatives (COPAC)

Asia Pacific Rural and Agricultural Credit Association (APRACA)

Association of Food and Agricultural Marketing Agencies in Asia and the Pacific (AFMA)

AACU

MEETING

2013

NEDAC’s EXCOM Meeting at NCDC, New Delhi, India

(click here for Minutes and Resolutions)

2011

(27 Nov - 3 Dec. , 2011)

Seminar on “Current Trends in Development of Agricultural Cooperatives in Asian Countries with Special Reference to legislative Changes and Policy Initiatives and NEDAC’s General Assembly Meeting (1 - 2 Dec, 2011)” at Togaytay City, Philippine. (Download Report)

2009

Seminar on “Bational Policy for Development of Agricultural Cooperatives”; Bangkok.

2008

FAO-NEDAC Regional workshop on “Role of agricultural cooperatives in response to the impact of natural disasters and climate change”; New Delhi. (Download Report)

2007

FAO-NEDAC Regional workshop on “Role of agricultural cooperatives in bio fuel development at community level for rural food and livelihood security”; Pattaya, Thailand (Download Report)

2006

FAO-NEDAC Seminar on Fair Trade; New Delhi (Download Report)

2004

Regional Cooperative Experts Meeting on Computerization to promote agricultural Cooperative Enterprise Development; Chiangmai, Thailand (Download Report)

Second Round Table Meeting on Regional Alliance against Hunger – Networking of Networks at Bangkok

2003

FAO-NEDAC Regional Meeting on Agricultural Cooperative Enterprise Development (ACED); New Delhi

NEDAC Seminar on “Information technology and computerization of agricultural cooperatives with special reference to SME development and business planning”; Kathmandu (Download Report)

2002

Meeting on Regional Project proposed for Capacity Building in Small and Medium Enterprise Development through Agricultural Cooperatives in selected Countries of Asia; Bangkok

2001

Round Table Meeting on Globalization and Liberalization: Challenges and Options for Agricultural Cooperatives in Asia; Bangkok

Roundtable Meeting on Capacity Building of Agricultural Cooperatives to Meet Market and Human Resources Development Requirements; Beijing

NEWS & EVENTS

2013

ExCom Meeting at NCDC, New Delhi

(click here for Minutes and Resolutions)

2011

GA and EXCOM 2011 27th Nov. to 3rd Dec, 2011

Click here for Minutes and Resolution

2010

Click here for Work Plan/Programme of NEDAC for 2010-2011

NEDAC EXCOM-2010

International meeting of Co-operators in Cebu, Philippines November 18 – 20, 2009

Click here for details

2009

NEDAC General Assembly 2009

“NEDAC General Assembly and a Seminar on National Policy(ies) for Development of Agricultural Co-operatives” was held at Bangkok from 30 August to 5 September, 2009, It was hosted by Cooperative Promotion Department (CPD), Ministry of Agriculture, Thailand.

Click here for Minutes/Resolutions of the General Assembly

2008

FAO message on 11th UN International Day of Cooperatives

Confronting climate change through cooperative enterprise - Full Report

FAO-NEDAC Regional workshop on “Role of agricultural cooperatives in response to the impact of natural disasters and climate change”; New Delhi

Senior government officials and cooperative leaders from Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Philippines, Sri Lanka and Thailand attended the workshop in New Delhi, India from 6 to 8 May 2008 to discuss the role of agricultural cooperatives and farmers’ organizations in mitigation and adaptation to the impact of natural disasters and climate change in Asia. Full Report

2007

FAO-NEDAC Regional workshop on “Role of agricultural cooperatives in biofuel development at community level for rural food and livelihood security”; Pattaya, Thailand

Senior government officials, cooperative leaders and experts on biofuels from China, India, Malaysia, Philippines and Thailand met in Pattaya, Thailand on 5 and 6 July 2007 to discuss how agricultural cooperatives can take advantage of the growing opportunities in biofuel development in Asia. (Full Report)

2006

FAO-NEDAC Seminar on Fair Trade

FAO-NEDAC Seminar on Fair Trade and NEDAC General Assembly (GA) was held at NCDC, New Delhi. [Download Report]

PUBLICATIONS

Reports

FAO-NEDAC Regional workshop on “Role of agricultural cooperatives in response to the impact of natural disasters and climate change”, 2008 (Download Report)

FAO-NEDAC Regional workshop on “Role of agricultural cooperatives in bio fuel development at community level for rural food and livelihood security”, 2007 (Download Report)

FAO-NEDAC Seminar on Fair Trade, 2006 (Download Report)

Regional Cooperative Experts Meeting on Computerization to promote agricultural Cooperative Enterprise Development, 2004

NEDAC Seminar on “Information technology and computerization of agricultural cooperatives with special reference to SME development and business planning”; Kathmandu, 2003 (Download Report)

Technical papers

Status and Trends of Agricultural Cooperative Development in the light of New Economic and Social Changes (1993)

Development of Market Information Systems in Agricultural Cooperatives (1993)

Role of Agricultural Cooperatives for Sustainable Agriculture and Rural Development in a Market Oriented Economy (1995)

Gender Issues & Peoples’ participation in Agricultural Cooperatives (1995)

National Perceptions and Strategies for Agricultural Cooperative Development (1997)

Strategies of Agricultural Cooperatives in the light of the financial crisis (1997)

Training approaches for Strengthening Agricultural Cooperative Development (1997)

Membership Participation and Coalition Building between Government and Cooperative Organisations (1997)

Training-of-trainers’ manuals in 1999.